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Australian Data Archive
Study Information Content
Study TitleWorking holiday makers in Australia, 1986
Primary InvestigatorDepartment of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs
ADA IDau.edu.anu.ada.ddi.00581
AbstractThe Australian Government offers a Working Holday Makers Scheme to young independent resourceful people, primarily from the United Kingdom, Canada, Ireland, Japan and the Netherlands. This scheme allows the applicants to stay in Australia for up to twelve months and undertake casual employment while holidaying in Australia. The aims of this study were: to investigate the scheme and its impact on labour markets and employers; to develop a profile of a sample of holiday makers already in Australia; to determine the patterns of their occupational and geographical mobility; and to determine employer attitudes to the employment of Working Holiday Makers. Topics covered include for employers: country preferences; alternative employment arrangements; reasons for employing vistors under the scheme; length of time employees stayed; opinions on the reliability of working holiday makers and advantages and disadvantages of the scheme; methods of employee recruitment; and total number of employees. Working holdiay makers were asked questions on : country of birth; household composition at home; parents' occupations; marital status, and birthplace of spouse; educational qualifications; employment history prior to departure; employment details after arrival in Australia; places visited in Australia and mode of transport; accommodation and amount earned while in Australia; opinions on the scheme; sources of information on the scheme; impressions of Australia; and native language. Data not available on Nesstar. Please contact archive staff at ada@anu.edu.au if you wish to access these data.
Production Date (documentation)1990-09-20
Bibliographic CitationDepartment of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs. Working holiday makers in Australia, 1986 [computer file]. Canberra: Australian Data Archive, The Australian National University, 1990.
CopyrightCopyright © 2005, Bureau of Immigration Research. All rights reserved.
ContactBureau of Immigration Research P.O. Box 25 Belconnen A.C.T. 2616
Study Scope Content
Topic ClassificationsAustralian studies;Employment, Labour;Attitudes towards work, Work experiences
KeywordsEmployment;Leisure;Travel
Population (Universe)Applicants for the Working Holiday Makers Scheme must meet a number of conditions to qualify to take part in the scheme. Working holiday makers are usually given a visa in their own country of origin for up to six months. They can then apply for an extension for a period of up to twelve months. The universe sampled was a listing of those Working Holiday Makers who applied to the Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs offices in Sydney, Melbourne or Brisbane, for an extension of their stay in Australia. At the time of application at the Sydney, Melbourne or Brisbane DIEA offices, working holiday makers were asked to complete a form giving their current address and indicating their willingness to participate in the survey. The universe of employers of working holiday makers were those who had employed working holiday makers contacted in the above survey.
Date of Collection
Start date - Data Collection: 1986-01-01 End date - Data Collection: 1986-01-01
Time Period
Time Period - Start: 1986-01-01 Time Period - End: 1986-01-01
Methodology Content
Sampling ProcedureA sample was taken from the listing of Working Holiday Makers who applied for an extension. At the start of the survey, it was agreed that quotas would be set for each centre. During the interviewing period, it became apparent that the response rate was not as high as originally estimated, as working holiday makers were very mobile people and frequently left the given address before an interviewer called. As the survey progressed, it was agreed that changes needed to be made. First, many working holiday makers who applied in Brisbane were residing in the Gold Coast. A decision to include these respondents was made. Second, the city quotas was dropped. Third, to increase the response rate in Melbourne, applicants were interviewed in Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs offices at the time of their appointments for extended visa applications. Lastly, the survey period was extended to achieve the quota. In the employers' sample 220 usable names were supplied by working holiday makers. To determine eligibility, employers were asked three questions: did they know of the scheme, were they aware that they had employed someone under the scheme, were they aware that the person was in Australia temporarily. If respondents answered 'yes' to any of those questions, they were eligible for interviews. Only 148 of the 220 names were contacted, and of these 74 met the eligibility criteria.
Data Kindsurvey
Data Access Content
Access ConditionsThe depositor wishes to be informed of use being made of the data, in order to comment on that use and make contact with colleagues of similar interests.
Deposit Information Content
DepositorBureau of Immigration Research P.O. Box 25 Belconnen A.C.T. 2616
Deposit Date1990-09-20
Other Content
Mode of Data Collectionpersonal interview
CommentThe Australian Government offers a Working Holday Makers Scheme to young independent resourceful people, primarily from the United Kingdom, Canada, Ireland, Japan and the Netherlands. This scheme allows the applicants to stay in Australia for up to twelve months and undertake casual employment while holidaying in Australia. The aims of this study were: to investigate the scheme and its impact on labour markets and employers; to develop a profile of a sample of holiday makers already in Australia; to determine the patterns of their occupational and geographical mobility; and to determine employer attitudes to the employment of Working Holiday Makers. Topics covered include for employers: country preferences; alternative employment arrangements; reasons for employing vistors under the scheme; length of time employees stayed; opinions on the reliability of working holiday makers and advantages and disadvantages of the scheme; methods of employee recruitment; and total number of employees. Working holdiay makers were asked questions on : country of birth; household composition at home; parents' occupations; marital status, and birthplace of spouse; educational qualifications; employment history prior to departure; employment details after arrival in Australia; places visited in Australia and mode of transport; accommodation and amount earned while in Australia; opinions on the scheme; sources of information on the scheme; impressions of Australia; and native language. Data not available on Nesstar. Please contact archive staff at ada@anu.edu.au if you wish to access these data.
Study Creation Date2011-04-18 18:05:24 UTC
Data CollectorsAustralian Sales Research Bureau
Bibliographic Citation (documentation)Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs. Working holiday makers in Australia, 1986 [computer file]. Canberra: Australian Data Archive, The Australian National University, 1990.
Copyright (documentation)Copyright © 2005, The Australian National University. All rights reserved.
Producer (documentation)Australian Data Archive
Title (documentation)Working holiday makers in Australia, 1986
ADA IDau.edu.anu.ada.ddi.00581
LabelWorking holiday makers in Australia, 1986
Languageen
Production Date2005-01-31
Time Methodcross-sectional (one-time) study

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