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Australian Data Archive
Study Information Content
Study TitleANZUS, arms control and nuclear defence systems, Australian attitudes, June 1985
Primary InvestigatorUnited States Information Service
ADA IDau.edu.anu.ada.ddi.00530
AbstractTopics in this survey include: ANZUS; support for ANZUS; support for variety of forms of defence co-operation; US or Australia benefits gained by Australia from ANZUS; ANZUS and risk of attack of Australia; trust in US to come to Australia's defence; visits by US nuclear-powered warships; visits by US warships carrying nuclear weapons; ability of Australia to defend itself; confidence in the ability of the US and USSR to deal responsibly with world problems; commitment by US and USSR to reach arms reduction agreement; purposes of SDI or 'Star Wars'; respondent's reading on SDI or 'Star Wars'; consequences of US development of anti-missile defence system; importance of US development of anti-missile defence system; anti-missile defence system and increased chance of arms agreement v./ accelerated arms race; anti-missile defence system and risk of nuclear war; anti-missile defence system and conventional war; USSR research anti-missile defence system; USSR deployment anti-missile defence system; anti-missile defence system and deterrence v./ 'bargaining chip'; anti-missile defence system and rationales for research. Standard variables include Federal voting intention, household size, age, marital status, schooling, occupation of respondent or of main income earner, household income, country of birth, industry sector, religion, tenure of dwelling, sex, area. This study is part of a series (SSDA No's 525 to 532) commissioned by the United States Information Service between 1982 and 1985 on Australians' attitudes to defence issues. Similar studies were carried out in New Zealand at the same time (SSDA No's 521 to 524) which contain some parallel questions. Data not available on Nesstar. Please contact archive staff at ada@anu.edu.au if you wish to access these data.
Production Date (documentation)2005-01-31
Bibliographic CitationUnited States Information Service. ANZUS, arms control and nuclear defence systems, Australian attitudes, June 1985 [computer file]. Canberra: Australian Data Archive, The Australian National University, 2005.
CopyrightCopyright © 2005, National Archives and Records Service,. All rights reserved.
ContactNational Archives and Records Service, Washington D.C., 20408,
Study Scope Content
Topic ClassificationsAustralian studies;Law, Crime, Courts;National security
KeywordsAnzus Treaty;Defence;Disarmament;International relations;Nuclear energy;Nuclear weapons;Soviet Union: International relations;United States: Defences;United States: International relations
Population (Universe)persons aged 14 and over throughout Australia
Date of Collection
Start date - Data Collection: End date - Data Collection:
Time Period
Time Period - Start: Time Period - End:
Methodology Content
Sampling Procedurearea-cluster sample with sex quota The sample was designed to produce a representative cross-section sample of Australian adults. Using the entire Australian electoral roll as the sampling frame, 110 dwellings were selected at random. Interviewers were then instructed to commence interviewing at the dwelling adjacent to, and at the right of, the random start (i.e. one of the 110 dwellings randomly selected) and to interview one individual there and in each adjacent dwelling, moving in a clockwise fashion around the block, until a cluster of 10 individuals was interviewed.
Data Kindsurvey
Data Access Content
Deposit Information Content
DepositorNational Archives and Records Service, Washington D.C., 20408,
Other Content
Mode of Data Collectionpersonal interview
CommentTopics in this survey include: ANZUS; support for ANZUS; support for variety of forms of defence co-operation; US or Australia benefits gained by Australia from ANZUS; ANZUS and risk of attack of Australia; trust in US to come to Australia's defence; visits by US nuclear-powered warships; visits by US warships carrying nuclear weapons; ability of Australia to defend itself; confidence in the ability of the US and USSR to deal responsibly with world problems; commitment by US and USSR to reach arms reduction agreement; purposes of SDI or 'Star Wars'; respondent's reading on SDI or 'Star Wars'; consequences of US development of anti-missile defence system; importance of US development of anti-missile defence system; anti-missile defence system and increased chance of arms agreement v./ accelerated arms race; anti-missile defence system and risk of nuclear war; anti-missile defence system and conventional war; USSR research anti-missile defence system; USSR deployment anti-missile defence system; anti-missile defence system and deterrence v./ 'bargaining chip'; anti-missile defence system and rationales for research. Standard variables include Federal voting intention, household size, age, marital status, schooling, occupation of respondent or of main income earner, household income, country of birth, industry sector, religion, tenure of dwelling, sex, area. This study is part of a series (SSDA No's 525 to 532) commissioned by the United States Information Service between 1982 and 1985 on Australians' attitudes to defence issues. Similar studies were carried out in New Zealand at the same time (SSDA No's 521 to 524) which contain some parallel questions. Data not available on Nesstar. Please contact archive staff at ada@anu.edu.au if you wish to access these data.
Study Creation Date2011-04-18 18:02:04 UTC
Data CollectorsRoy Morgan Research Centre
Bibliographic Citation (documentation)United States Information Service. ANZUS, arms control and nuclear defence systems, Australian attitudes, June 1985 [computer file]. Canberra: Australian Data Archive, The Australian National University, 2005.
Copyright (documentation)Copyright © 2005, The Australian National University. All rights reserved.
Producer (documentation)Australian Data Archive
Title (documentation)ANZUS, arms control and nuclear defence systems, Australian attitudes, June 1985
WeightingWeighting criteria The results are weighted by dividing Australia into a number of geographic areas and estimating the number of men and women, in various age groups, living in those areas. This produces about 310 'cells' containing some thousands of men and women of different age groups. The corresponding interviews in each 'cell' are then multiplied to represent the correct number of people in each cell. Weighting procedures The weight is an integer value and is included in the data file.
ADA IDau.edu.anu.ada.ddi.00530
LabelANZUS, arms control and nuclear defence systems, Australian attitudes, June 1985
Languageen
Production Date2005-01-31
Time Methodcross-sectional (one-time) study
WeightingWeighting criteria The results are weighted by dividing Australia into a number of geographic areas and estimating the number of men and women, in various age groups, living in those areas. This produces about 310 'cells' containing some thousands of men and women of different age groups. The corresponding interviews in each 'cell' are then multiplied to represent the correct number of people in each cell. Weighting procedures The weight is an integer value and is included in the data file.

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